Medicare for Baby Boomers and Beyond

Medicare for Baby Boomers and Beyond

Number of page: 278
Author: Robert E. Stedman
Publisher: American Book Publishing
Rating:
Category: Medical

How much do you know about the health care insurance you will use after age 65
Try to answer the following: • When should you enroll in Medicare
• Who is eligible for Medicare
• What is the premium you will pay for hospital insurance
• What is Medigap
• How many routine well-patient visits are you allowed during a Part B lifetime
• Can you name the criteria for admission to a Skilled Nursing Facility (SNF)
• How long will Part A allow you to remain in an SNF
• Can you name the program that Medicare Advantage is designed to replace
• How much will you pay for prescription drugs before Medicare Part D picks up 95% of the expense
• How much can you afford to pay for health care during your retirement years
Were you unable to answer most of these questions
A better understanding of Medicare’s rules today can save a lot of money tomorrow. Have you created a health care insurance budget
How much do you need to save now in order to pay for your health care needs in the future
This book will answer these questions along with many of your concerns about the requirements and cost of health care insurance during the Medicare years.

About The Author

After completing my medical training at Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine in 1970, I worked as an emergency-room physician at a suburban community hospital. Since several family physicians in the area had recently retired, the hospital administration asked me to consider opening an office that would be subsidized by continued work in the ER. It sounded like a great idea, but we had just spent our last dime purchasing and renovating an old Victorian fixer-upper in a small town of about nine hundred families near the hospital.When my wife suggested that we open an office in our home, it was all the incentive I needed. Obviously, she had ulterior motives, because I would have more interaction with my daughters as they grew up. Having the office in our home was reminiscent of a Norman Rockwell painting. I even had a little black bag and made house calls. The only items missing were the horse and buggy.As the practice flourished and the girls became teenagers, we either outgrew the home-office, or rock music from the third floor made physical exams impossible. Both items entered into the decision-making process of moving to a larger space. We've subsequently moved into a gorgeous two-physician office under the direction of a hospital affiliate called Lourdes Medical Associates. Needless to say, we no longer make house calls, I rarely see my girls or my grandchildren during the week, and I miss the good old days, except for the rock music.Medicare was only five years old when we started our adventure, and because we lived in an older, Victorian town, we had a large number of geriatric patients. You could say that the practice grew up with Medicare as it ushered in several HMOs of Part C during the 1990's and prescription-drug plans in Janury 2006.